Emerging technologies

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'Emerging technologies'. This covers a wide range of new and controversial technologies such as hydraulic fracturing (fracking), artificial intelligence and autonomous systems, climate/ geo-engineering, genetically-modified organisms and synthetic biology, and nanotechnologies. An explicit concern is the adequate application of the precautionary principle, and the possible alternatives to emerging technologies, including 'appropriate' technology and non-technological solutions such economic, political or social change.

Results 11 - 20 of 56

Examining the evidence

This report, published by Scientists for Global Responsibility (SGR) and the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health (CIEH), critically reviews current evidence across a number of issues associated with shale gas extraction by hydraulic fracturing (fracking). These include environmental and public health aspects, and socio-economic considerations. The report raises a number of important concerns, especially regarding regulation of the industry and problems related to climate change.

Following subsequent criticism by some supporters of fracking, we have also produced a rebuttal of their main points.

21 July 2014 (updated 14 August 2014)
 

Dr Eva Novotny, SGR, and Dr Jean Perdang, University of Liege, present in-depth analysis of the transport of pollen by wind, which has significant implications for setting separation distances between fields of GM and non-GM crops.

Two in-depth papers, 18 May 2014
 

Dr Stuart Parkinson picks his choice of the best non-fiction books of recent years to mark SGR’s 21st anniversary.

Article from SGR Newsletter no.42, autumn 2013; published online: 19 December 2013
 

An open letter to the publishers and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Food and Chemical Toxicology, regarding the potential pro-GM bias introduced by the appointment of a new Associate Editor, Richard Goodman.

1 October 2013
 

Dr Helena Paul and Dr Ricarda Steinbrecher, EcoNexus, warn that the rapidly developing field of synthetic biology – which proposes releasing artificial living organisms into the environment – is running ahead of the necessary precautionary controls.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 2 January 2013)
 

Science and technology have contributed to huge changes in human society, bringing many benefits, but also helping to cause global scale problems. Using a series of examples from the past century or so, this presentation examines the balance of costs and benefits, and argues that the role of science and technology in society needs to change, if we are not to be overhwhelmed by the problems we now face.

Presentation by Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, at the What is science for? teachers' conference, Widnes, Cheshire, UK

25 February 2012
 

Dr Joanna Haigh, Imperial College London, outlines the range of options currently being investigated by researchers and technologists to modify the climate system to try to prevent dangerous climate change – but finds that there are no ‘magic bullets’ here.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 40, autumn 2011 (published online 14 December 2011)
 

Dr Bronislaw Szerszynski, Lancaster University, argues that when it comes to new technologies, technical risk assessment is not enough.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 40, autumn 2011 (published online 6 December 2011)
 

Presentation by Dr Joanna Haigh, Imperial College London at the SGR conference, Emerging technologies: are the risks being neglected? on 21 May 2011
 

Presentation by Dr Bronislaw Szerszynski, Lancaster University, at the SGR conference, Emerging technologies: are the risks being neglected? on 21 May 2011