2005

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'security and disarmament'. This covers military technologies, arms control and disarmament (esp. nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, ‘Missile Defense’, conventional weapons) - as well as alternative concepts of security, peace building and conflict prevention.

Scientists and engineers have a central role in the development of weapons and therefore share a special responsibilty to society. SGR's project work has investigated the extensive influence that the military has over science and technology.

Results 1 - 10 of 13

Steve Wright, Leeds Metropolitan University, outlines the recently introduced European Union controls on torture equipment and assesses whether they are adequate to control current developments in military technology.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 31, December 2005
 

Dominick Jenkins argues that more scientists and engineers need to get active to help stop the UK government undermining attempts at nuclear disarmament.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 31, December 2005
 

Notes for a Seminar given by Chris Langley, SGR, at Kings College, London, November 2005
 

Texts of presentations by Chris Langley, SGR, to Pugwash Ethical Science Group, Imperial College, London, October 2005, and Totton Sixth-Form College, Southampton, November, 2005
 

Notes of a Presentation by Chris Langley, SGR, at the conference, 'Science and the international humanitarian law: Science to the service of war and the responsibility of scientists', Paris, September 2005
 

Text of a letter to The Lancet, co-signed by Stuart Parkinson, SGR, published on 10 September 2005
 

Presentation given by Dr Chris Langley, SGR, at the 9th Annual Conference on Economics and Security at the University of Bristol on 23-25 June, 2005
 

Presentation by Stuart Parkinson, SGR, on 'Engineering in Society' undergraduate course, Lancaster University, May 2005
 

Presentation by Dr Chris Langley, SGR, as part of a Debate at the Royal Institution on 11 May 2005