Newsletter articles

SGR Newsletters are published roughly twice a year. The main articles are listed below. For details of the current issue and back issues, See our Newsletter page

Results 11 - 20 of 54

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, critically assesses new UK and Western military initiatives, and how engineers and scientists can be involved in challenging the cycle of violence.

Article from SGR Newsletter no.43; online publication: 27 February 2015
 

On the centenary of the outbreak of World War I, Prof Peter Nicholls, University of Essex, examines the development and use of chemical weapons from that period to the modern day, highlighting some of the ethical debates involving scientists and policy-makers.

Article from SGR Newsletter no.43 (advance publication), 28 July 2014
 

Dr Stuart Parkinson picks his choice of the best non-fiction books of recent years to mark SGR’s 21st anniversary.

Article from SGR Newsletter no.42, autumn 2013; published online: 19 December 2013
 

Dr David Lowry examines the historical role of Britain’s civilian nuclear exports in the weapons programmes of countries like North Korea, and fears that the latest government initiatives will lead to history repeating itself.

Article from SGR Newsletter no.42, autumn 2013; advance online publication: 22 July 2013
 

Latest official statistics show that UK government spending on military research and development has fallen considerably over the last ten years – something that SGR has been calling for. Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, assesses the significance of the changes.

Article from SGR Newsletter 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 22 October 2012)
 

Prof Keith Barnham, Imperial College London, suggests renewable energy technologies can play a key role in arresting the spread of nuclear weapons in the Middle East and elsewhere.

Article from SGR Newsletter 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 22 October 2012)
 

Dr Rebecca Johnson, Acronym Institute, highlights the limited progress in nuclear disarmament since the end of the Cold War. Nevertheless, she argues that new academic research can help to reframe nuclear threats, providing future opportunities for more effective international initiatives to ban nuclear weapons.

Article from SGR Newsletter 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 22 October 2012)
 

Prof Noel Sharkey, Sheffield University, outlines the disturbing trends in military robotics, including armed drones.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 40, autumn 2011 (published online: 5 January 2012)
 

Martina Weitsch, QCEA, shows how arms companies – including those from Israel – have obtained public EU research funds, despite military research being specifically excluded from the formal R&D framework.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 40, autumn 2011 (published online 6 December 2011)
 

The UK and other NATO countries claim they took military action in Libya for humanitarian reasons. Stuart Parkinson, SGR, asks whether the situation was really that simple.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 40, autumn 2011 (published online 26 October 2011)