Security and disarmament

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'security and disarmament'. This covers military technologies, arms control and disarmament (esp. nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, ‘Missile Defense’, conventional weapons) - as well as alternative concepts of security, peace building and conflict prevention.

Scientists and engineers have a central role in the development of weapons and therefore share a special responsibilty to society. SGR's project work has investigated the extensive influence that the military has over science and technology.

Results 11 - 20 of 51

Tamara Lorincz, International Peace Bureau, discusses the twin problems of carbon pollution due to military activities and the priority given by governments to funding their militaries over tackling climate change.

Presentation at SGR conference; online publication: 4 November 2015

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, critically examines the UK arms industry, starting with ethical issues such as nuclear weapons, the international arms trade and influence over UK security policy. He then considers the potential for alternatives - including less aggressive approaches to international security and expansion of civilian employment, including low carbon technologies.

Presentation at the 37th NJPN conference, Derbyshire, UK; 18 July 2015

Presentation by Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, at Lancaster University

1 December 2014

Presentation by Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, at the workshop, ‘Militarization of Science 1914 and Today’, at the Sarajevo Peace Event, Bosnia. Similar presentations were given at the NATO counter-summit, Newport, Wales and the CAAT/STW campaigners day, Manchester, England.

6 June; 31 August; 11 October 2014

Presentation by Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, at Dept of Sociology, Lancaster University

25 February 2014

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, argues that current funding patterns of R&D in the UK support a militaristic approach to dealing with security problems. He makes the case for a shift in funding to R&D which helps to tackle the roots of conflict, including climate change.

Presentation at SGR conference, London, 16 November 2013, and in Kendal, Cumbria, 30 November 2013

Dr Philip Webber, SGR, outlines the catastrophic humanitarian and climatic consequences should nuclear weapons ever be used, particularly focusing on the consequences if the UK fired its Trident nuclear missiles. He also discusses some hopeful signs for international nuclear disarmament.

Presentation at SGR conference, London, 16 November 2013

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, argues that contrary to popular belief there are numerous reasons why military research and development is not helping to improve security, and makes the case for alternatives.

Presentation at York University, 23 October 2013

Dr Philip Webber, SGR, outlines the devastating impacts of a nuclear weapon attack on a UK city, using the case study of Manchester. He also summarises climatic and other effects should nuclear war ever happen.

Presentation at Manchester Town Hall, 4 October 2013

Military use of science and technology is commonly argued to be good for our security. Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, presents a range of evidence to show that this view has major flaws, and argues for a change in priorities for security R&D.

Presentation at Leeds Headingley Cafe Scientifique, 14 May 2013 (references updated 3 June 2013)