Who controls science and technology?

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'Who controls science and technology?' This includes the power of vested interests (especially the military and private corporations), openness and democracy in science, and public engagement and participation. Two of our main projects focus on military influence on science and technology, and corporate influence on science and technology.

Results 11 - 20 of 24

Martina Weitsch, QCEA, shows how arms companies – including those from Israel – have obtained public EU research funds, despite military research being specifically excluded from the formal R&D framework.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 40, autumn 2011 (published online 6 December 2011)
 

Philip Moriarty, University of Nottingham, asks whether the practices now followed by UK research councils are doing little more than enabling the government’s policy to further commercialise academic research.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 40, autumn 2011 (published online 6 December 2011)
 

It is 200 years since the Luddite uprisings in northern England. David King, Human Genetics Alert, argues that the motivations of the Luddites have been misrepresented, and that we need to look again at their legacy.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 40, autumn 2011 (published online 6 December 2011)
 

Dr Helen Wallace, GeneWatch, highlights the failure of the biotech economy and argues that decisions on R&D investments should be made more democratic and accountable.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 39, winter 2011 (published online 4 March 2011)
 

Stuart Parkinson, SGR, examines the government’s spending cuts.

Article from SGR Newsletter No. 39, winter 2011 (published online: 26 January 2011)
 

Stuart Parkinson discusses the latest twists and turns in the climate science debate, and its relevance for public interest science.

Editorial from SGR Newsletter no. 38; winter 2010
 

Stuart Parkinson and Chris Langley summarise SGR’s latest report, Science and the corporate agenda

Article from SGR Newsletter, no. 38; winter 2010
 

A staff group at the Open University are proposing an ethical strategy for the development of external partnerships, which would include a severing of the institution’s links with the arms industry.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 38; winter 2010
 

Phil Chamberlain discovers some disturbing activities on Salisbury Plain.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 37, spring 2009
 

Chris Langley summarises SGR’s latest research on military influence at UK universities, highlighting a range of serious concerns and making recommendations for reform.

Article from SGR Newsletter, No. 36, autumn 2008