Security and disarmament

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'security and disarmament'. This covers military technologies, arms control and disarmament (esp. nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, ‘Missile Defense’, conventional weapons) - as well as alternative concepts of security, peace building and conflict prevention.

Scientists and engineers have a central role in the development of weapons and therefore share a special responsibilty to society. SGR's project work has investigated the extensive influence that the military has over science and technology.

Results 41 - 50 of 54

Iran is under scrutiny: Western governments claim its nascent nuclear power programme masks plans for nuclear weapons development. Frank Barnaby, Oxford Research Group, assesses the validity of the West’s claims and argues that use of military force against Iran’s nuclear programme will only make matters worse.

Article from SGR Newletter, no. 34, summer 2007
 

The SGR report ‘Soldiers in the Laboratory’ prompted Steve Wright, Leeds Metropolitan University, to consider the real-life legacy of military involvement in science and engineering. Here he describes an eye-opening trip that showed him just what that means.

Article in SGR Newsletter no. 34, summer 2007
 

Chris Langley describes how military interests have become pervasive in robotic science and engineering and outlines the ethical problems this causes.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 33, winter 2007
 

John Sloboda, Oxford Research Group, argues that our governments’ obsession with terrorism is stopping us from tackling the underlying causes of global insecurity.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 33, winter 2007
 

Philip Webber and Stuart Parkinson summarise the recent developments surrounding nuclear weapons and nuclear power in the UK.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 32, June 2006
 

Dave Webb, Leeds Metropolitan University, argues that the huge imbalance between the resources available to the military and those devoted to meeting basic human needs urgently has to change. As an illustration of the misdirection of scientific and technological effort, he discusses some of the latest military technologies such as space weapons.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 32, June 2006
 

Alan Cottey, University of East Anglia, recommends a new look at Niels Bohr’s early ideas concerning openness on nuclear issues as a path to international confidence and a new world order.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 32, June 2006
 

Steve Wright, Leeds Metropolitan University, outlines the recently introduced European Union controls on torture equipment and assesses whether they are adequate to control current developments in military technology.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 31, December 2005
 

Dominick Jenkins argues that more scientists and engineers need to get active to help stop the UK government undermining attempts at nuclear disarmament.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 31, December 2005
 

In this article based on his presentation to the SGR conference, John Finney, University College London, argues that a decision should be made now not to replace the UK’s Trident nuclear weapons.

Article from SGR Newsletter 28, November 2003