Security and disarmament

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'security and disarmament'. This covers military technologies, arms control and disarmament (esp. nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, ‘Missile Defense’, conventional weapons) - as well as alternative concepts of security, peace building and conflict prevention.

Scientists and engineers have a central role in the development of weapons and therefore share a special responsibilty to society. SGR's project work has investigated the extensive influence that the military has over science and technology.

Results 121 - 130 of 190

Steven Starr, Physicians for Social Responsibility, argues that the continued maintenance of US and Russian nuclear weapons on high alert means that the threat of accidental (or deliberate) global nuclear war has not gone away.

Article from SGR Newsletter, no. 36, autumn 2008
 

Chris Langley summarises SGR’s latest research on military influence at UK universities, highlighting a range of serious concerns and making recommendations for reform.

Article from SGR Newsletter, No. 36, autumn 2008
 

Stuart Tannock, Cardiff University, discusses the disturbing implications of the Ministry of Defence’s new multibillion pound training academy.

Article from SGR Newsletter, No. 36, autumn 2008
 

Alison Whyte introduces a new global campaign for a Nuclear Weapons Convention, and discusses some hopeful signs of progress.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 36, autumn 2008
 

Press release, 25 September 2008
 

Military influence, commercial pressures and the compromised university

SGR briefing by Chris Langley, Stuart Parkinson and Philip Webber; June 2008

This briefing builds upon the disclosures of, and recommendations provided in, Soldiers in the Laboratory and More Soldiers in the Laboratory and focuses on the impact of military sector influence within the research and teaching environment of universities in the UK.
 

Press release, 12 June 2008
 

Stuart Parkinson and Chris Langley outline SGR’s latest research whose revelations include statistics from across the industrialised world showing the massive imbalance between government R&D spending for military purposes and that for social and environmental purposes.

Article for SGR Newsletter, No. 35, winter 2008
 

Philip Webber, SGR, analyses the latest research on the potential climatic impacts of nuclear war and demonstrates that the firepower of just one of the UK’s Trident submarines could be devastating for the whole planet.

Article from SGR Newsletter, No. 35, winter 2008
 

Steven Schofield argues that investing the billions earmarked for Trident replacement in alternative sectors would more than offset the job losses in the nuclear weapons sector.

Article from SGR Newsletter, No. 35, winter 2008