Security and disarmament

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'security and disarmament'. This covers military technologies, arms control and disarmament (esp. nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, ‘Missile Defense’, conventional weapons) - as well as alternative concepts of security, peace building and conflict prevention.

Scientists and engineers have a central role in the development of weapons and therefore share a special responsibilty to society. SGR's project work has investigated the extensive influence that the military has over science and technology.

Results 131 - 140 of 191

Steven Schofield argues that investing the billions earmarked for Trident replacement in alternative sectors would more than offset the job losses in the nuclear weapons sector.

Article from SGR Newsletter, No. 35, winter 2008
 

Noel Sharkey, Sheffiled University, gives a stark warning about the potential for a robot arms race.

Article from SGR Newsletter, no. 35, winter 2008
 

Beccie D’Cunha describes two recent, important victories.

Article from SGR Newsletter no.35, winter 2008
 

David Webb suggests current US plans for missile defence may cause more problems than they solve.

Article from SGR Newsletter, no. 35, winter 2008
 

Article by Chris Langley, SGR

The Economics of Peace and Security Journal, Vol. 3; No. 1, p.49-55, January 2008
 

Presentation by Dr Chris Langley, SGR, in the European Parliament under the auspices of the Quaker Intergroup for Peace Initiatives, Nov 2007
 

Presentation given by Stuart Parkinson, SGR, at a public meeting in Kendal, Cumbria; October 2007
 

Iran is under scrutiny: Western governments claim its nascent nuclear power programme masks plans for nuclear weapons development. Frank Barnaby, Oxford Research Group, assesses the validity of the West’s claims and argues that use of military force against Iran’s nuclear programme will only make matters worse.

Article from SGR Newletter, no. 34, summer 2007
 

The SGR report ‘Soldiers in the Laboratory’ prompted Steve Wright, Leeds Metropolitan University, to consider the real-life legacy of military involvement in science and engineering. Here he describes an eye-opening trip that showed him just what that means.

Article in SGR Newsletter no. 34, summer 2007