Security and disarmament

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'security and disarmament'. This covers military technologies, arms control and disarmament (esp. nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, ‘Missile Defense’, conventional weapons) - as well as alternative concepts of security, peace building and conflict prevention.

Scientists and engineers have a central role in the development of weapons and therefore share a special responsibilty to society. SGR's project work has investigated the extensive influence that the military has over science and technology.

Results 151 - 160 of 190

Philip Webber and Stuart Parkinson summarise the recent developments surrounding nuclear weapons and nuclear power in the UK.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 32, June 2006
 

Dave Webb, Leeds Metropolitan University, argues that the huge imbalance between the resources available to the military and those devoted to meeting basic human needs urgently has to change. As an illustration of the misdirection of scientific and technological effort, he discusses some of the latest military technologies such as space weapons.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 32, June 2006
 

Alan Cottey, University of East Anglia, recommends a new look at Niels Bohr’s early ideas concerning openness on nuclear issues as a path to international confidence and a new world order.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 32, June 2006
 

Presentation to the Café Scientifique in Brighton by Dr Chris Langley, SGR, on 16 May 2006
 

12 inspiring cases of ethical careers in science and technology

SGR ethical careers booklet edited by Stuart Parkinson and Vanessa Spedding; April 2006

12 scientists and engineers tell of their experiences in trying to follow an ethical career. The cases cover a wide range of issues relating to the environment, social justice, the military, and animal welfare.
 

Notes for a presentation by Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, for a Demos seminar, held in London on 30 March 2006
 

SGR ethical careers briefing by Chris Langley; January 2006

This briefing discusses military involvement with science and engineering, and how it can affect career choice in these fields. It outlines how the UK’s position as a major military power influences research, teaching, and development and deployment of new technologies, and discusses the related ethical issues. The briefing also gives tips on avoiding military work and describes opportunities in a range of alternative fields such as peace-building, disarmament, and cleaner energy technologies.
 

Steve Wright, Leeds Metropolitan University, outlines the recently introduced European Union controls on torture equipment and assesses whether they are adequate to control current developments in military technology.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 31, December 2005
 

Dominick Jenkins argues that more scientists and engineers need to get active to help stop the UK government undermining attempts at nuclear disarmament.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 31, December 2005