Security and disarmament

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'security and disarmament'. This covers military technologies, arms control and disarmament (esp. nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, ‘Missile Defense’, conventional weapons) - as well as alternative concepts of security, peace building and conflict prevention.

Scientists and engineers have a central role in the development of weapons and therefore share a special responsibilty to society. SGR's project work has investigated the extensive influence that the military has over science and technology.

Results 171 - 180 of 191

Military involvement in science and technology - and some alternatives

SGR report - written by Chris Langley; edited by Stuart Parkinson and Philip Webber; 19 January 2005

The UK’s involvement in the ‘War on terror’, especially the use of military force in Iraq, has been one of the most hotly contested issues in recent years. Meanwhile public confidence in science has been hit hard by controversies from GM crops to the MMR vaccine. This report investigates where military and scientific endeavours have intertwined—revealing the extent of the power and influence that the military has within UK science and engineering. The report describes how this influence has developed since the end of the Cold War, and examines whether the current level of military involvement in science and technology is the best way of contributing to the goals of peace, social justice and environmental sustainability.
 

Notes for a lecture given by Stuart Parkinson, SGR, at Lancaster University Engineering Dept, 26 May 2004
 

SGR ethical careers briefing by David Webb; April 2004

This briefing provides an insight into the implications of choosing a career in any field associated with space exploration or space technology. The forces that drive developments in space technology are complex, often political, and very often linked – either overtly or covertly – with a military imperative. The briefing aims to facilitate a deeper appreciation of these forces by offering a perspective on this military influence on the space industry that’s rarely seen elsewhere.
 

Presentation given by Philip Webber, SGR, to the “Missile Defence - Threats, Responses and Projections” Conference, University of Bradford, 18 March 2004.
 

In this article based on his presentation to the SGR conference, John Finney, University College London, argues that a decision should be made now not to replace the UK’s Trident nuclear weapons.

Article from SGR Newsletter 28, November 2003
 

Stuart Parkinson looks into why the climatic disaster which would follow a potential nuclear war has been forgotten

Article from SGR Newsletter 27, July 2003
 

Issued on 24 July 2003
 

Notes for a Lecture by Stuart Parkinson, SGR, for CCE seminar ‘The War on Terror’, Sussex University on 5 July 2003
 

Short report summarising the arguments against the War on Iraq.

Philip Webber and Vanessa Spedding, with contributions from Stuart Parkinson and Eva Novotny, 27 March 2003