Security and disarmament

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'security and disarmament'. This covers military technologies, arms control and disarmament (esp. nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, ‘Missile Defense’, conventional weapons) - as well as alternative concepts of security, peace building and conflict prevention.

Scientists and engineers have a central role in the development of weapons and therefore share a special responsibilty to society. SGR's project work has investigated the extensive influence that the military has over science and technology.

Results 61 - 70 of 198

ResponsibleSci blog entry by Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, 28 March 2014
 

Over a dozen SGR members, including Secretary Dr Charalampos Tsoumpas and Sponsor Prof David Webb are among the signatories of a letter to The Guardian newspaper protesting about arms industry sponsorship of the The Big Bang science fair.

12 March 2014
 

Presentation by Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, at Dept of Sociology, Lancaster University

25 February 2014
 

Weapons of mass destruction get five times as much public research cash in the UK as renewable energy. Time for a rethink, says Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR

Article in New Scientist, 10 February 2014
 

Press release, 10 February 2014
 

Dr Chris Langley, SGR, examines how two factors - the embrace of corporate partners by science and technology university departments and the erosion of distinctions between the military and the police - have contributed to disturbing security trends in the UK and elsewhere. The root causes of insecurity meanwhile go unaddressed.

Article published on openDemocracy website, 19 December 2013
 

Dr Stuart Parkinson picks his choice of the best non-fiction books of recent years to mark SGR’s 21st anniversary.

Article from SGR Newsletter no.42, autumn 2013; published online: 19 December 2013
 

Press release and open letter, 13 December 2013
 

Press release, 10 December 2013

(in association with the International Campaign Against Nuclear Weapons)
 

Most approaches to global security are based on the idea that insecurity can be controlled through military force. We should be tackling threats such as climate change, economic injustice and resource depletion instead, argues Dr Chris Langley, SGR.

Article for New Left Project website, 4 December 2013