Security and disarmament

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'security and disarmament'. This covers military technologies, arms control and disarmament (esp. nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, ‘Missile Defense’, conventional weapons) - as well as alternative concepts of security, peace building and conflict prevention.

Scientists and engineers have a central role in the development of weapons and therefore share a special responsibilty to society. SGR's project work has investigated the extensive influence that the military has over science and technology.

Results 61 - 70 of 190

Most approaches to global security are based on the idea that insecurity can be controlled through military force. We should be tackling threats such as climate change, economic injustice and resource depletion instead, argues Dr Chris Langley, SGR.

Article for New Left Project website, 4 December 2013
 

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, argues that current funding patterns of R&D in the UK support a militaristic approach to dealing with security problems. He makes the case for a shift in funding to R&D which helps to tackle the roots of conflict, including climate change.

Presentation at SGR conference, London, 16 November 2013, and in Kendal, Cumbria, 30 November 2013
 

Dr Philip Webber, SGR, outlines the catastrophic humanitarian and climatic consequences should nuclear weapons ever be used, particularly focusing on the consequences if the UK fired its Trident nuclear missiles. He also discusses some hopeful signs for international nuclear disarmament.

Presentation at SGR conference, London, 16 November 2013
 

New analysis has revealed how much the funding of research into military technology outweighs spending to tackle the roots of conflict, says Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR

Article in Engineering and Technology Magazine, 11 November 2013
 

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, argues that contrary to popular belief there are numerous reasons why military research and development is not helping to improve security, and makes the case for alternatives.

Presentation at York University, 23 October 2013
 

Dr Philip Webber, SGR, outlines the devastating impacts of a nuclear weapon attack on a UK city, using the case study of Manchester. He also summarises climatic and other effects should nuclear war ever happen.

Presentation at Manchester Town Hall, 4 October 2013
 

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, appears in a new film produced by the Movement for the Abolition of War.

2 October 2013
 

Why is the UK government focusing R&D spending on offensive weapons in preference to tackling the roots of conflict?

Article by Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, on The Guardian's Political Science blog, 30 September 2013
 

The UK government’s military research and development (R&D) spending is heavily focused on offensive weapons systems, which do not tackle the main threats to our security, says a report out today.

Press release, 30 September 2013
 

Campaigning for ethical engineering and science in the UK

A chapter, written by Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, in a new book entitled Peace Engineering: When personal values and engineering careers converge

1 September 2013