Who controls science and technology?

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'Who controls science and technology?' This includes the power of vested interests (especially the military and private corporations), openness and democracy in science, and public engagement and participation. Two of our main projects focus on military influence on science and technology, and corporate influence on science and technology.

Results 21 - 30 of 106

Science4society week is a new collection of science education activities, designed to inspire young people. The project was set up to provide an alternative to activities funded by the arms and fossil fuel industries, such as ‘The Big Bang Fair’. Science4society week 2015 runs from 16th to 23rd March.

Media release, 6 March 2015
 

Dr Eva Novotny discusses the controversy surrounding an academic paper showing health problems in a feeding trial of a GM crop – and what it says about corporate influence in this field.

Article from SGR Newsletter no.43 (advance publication), 24 October 2014

Update added, 26 February 2015
 

Presentation by Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, at the 'Circling the Square' conference, Nottingham University.

Based on SGR's research, the presentation summarises how powerful interests - such as large corporations and the military - can and do distort science for their own ends.

22 May 2014
 

ResponsibleSci blog entry by Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, 28 March 2014
 

Over a dozen SGR members, including Secretary Dr Charalampos Tsoumpas and Sponsor Prof David Webb are among the signatories of a letter to The Guardian newspaper protesting about arms industry sponsorship of the The Big Bang science fair.

12 March 2014
 

Weapons of mass destruction get five times as much public research cash in the UK as renewable energy. Time for a rethink, says Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR

Article in New Scientist, 10 February 2014
 

Dr Chris Langley, SGR, examines how two factors - the embrace of corporate partners by science and technology university departments and the erosion of distinctions between the military and the police - have contributed to disturbing security trends in the UK and elsewhere. The root causes of insecurity meanwhile go unaddressed.

Article published on openDemocracy website, 19 December 2013
 

Dr Stuart Parkinson picks his choice of the best non-fiction books of recent years to mark SGR’s 21st anniversary.

Article from SGR Newsletter no.42, autumn 2013; published online: 19 December 2013
 

Press release and open letter, 13 December 2013
 

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, argues that contrary to popular belief there are numerous reasons why military research and development is not helping to improve security, and makes the case for alternatives.

Presentation at York University, 23 October 2013