Who controls science and technology?

SGR produces a range of resources on the issue of 'Who controls science and technology?' This includes the power of vested interests (especially the military and private corporations), openness and democracy in science, and public engagement and participation. Two of our main projects focus on military influence on science and technology, and corporate influence on science and technology.

A great opportunity to promote science and technology which help to tackle the climate emergency and militarism.

For more details and instructions on how to apply, see:
https://www.sgr.org.uk/pages/vacancies

Deadline: 21 August

Andrew Simms and Dr Philip Webber, SGR, argue that the failure to follow principles of responsible science during the Covid-19 crisis compromises policy-making and threatens to undermine public trust.

6 May 2020

The effects of the Covid-19 pandemic are profoundly affecting our world. Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, takes an initial look at some of the lessons we should be learning.

25 March 2020

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, looks at how the fossil fuel and arms industries finance professional engineering and science organisations - and the many issues this raises - in this summary of the new report, Irresponsible Science?

6 October 2019

Dr Philip Webber, SGR, argues that UK government thinking on security needs to change profoundly, and use more of a science-based approach to tackling global problems.

5 June 2019

In advance of a European Parliament vote on the new European Defence Fund - which would allow 13 billion euros to be spent on military research and technology - 1000 researchers have signed a statement opposing the fund.

17 April 2019

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, examines how society uses and misuses science and technology - and highlights ways in which we can reshape our relationship with these powerful forces to help bring about a more secure and sustainable society.

Bristol Peace Lecture, 9 March 2019

Fears of an artificial intelligence apocalypse make the news, but it's AI-fuelled inequality we should worry about, says Andrew Simms, SGR.

Article from New Scientist, 14 November 2018

SGR patron Prof Keith Barnham reflects on his work with Scientists Against Nuclear Arms investigating the military diversion of civilian nuclear materials – and considers the relevance for academics and activists today.

Article from SGR Newsletter no.46; online publication: 12 April 2018

Dr Keith Baker, Glasgow Caledonian University, looks at the prospects for British universities as the end of UK membership of the European Union approaches.

Article from SGR Newsletter no.46; online publication: 22 February 2018