Issues

We currently focus on four main issues: disarmament and security, climate change and energy, questions of who controls science and technology and issues surrounding new and emerging technologies. You will also see that we work on some other issues too. You can explore these with the menu on the left of this page and with the search function. Material in this section includes all SGR's main outputs since 2005, with a selection of the more important material from before then.

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, argues that there is too much focus on technology within mainstream climate change strategies and that there needs to be a better balance between technology, economic and political solutions. This would lead to more effective climate policies and would contribute to quality of life improvements.

Presentation at Warwick Climate Forum, 24 November 2012.
 

Dr Tim Foxon, University of Leeds, summarises new academic research examining the major choices for the UK as the nation tries to de-carbonise its electricity system.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 14 November 2012)
 

Prof AbuBakr Bahaj, University of Southampton, outlines the recent positive progress in generating electricity from offshore wind, wave and tidal current resources in the UK. He also assesses the future challenges in a sector in which the UK is a global leader.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 14 November 2012)
 

Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, looks at the factors that have led to the prominence of climate change sceptics over the past two decades and asks whether they are as influential as they seem.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 12 November 2012)
 

Dr Alice Bell argues that corporate sponsorship of science communication has gone too far, and announces a new campaign to challenge it.

Article from SGR Newsletter no. 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 2 November 2012)
 

Latest official statistics show that UK government spending on military research and development has fallen considerably over the last ten years – something that SGR has been calling for. Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, assesses the significance of the changes.

Article from SGR Newsletter 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 22 October 2012)
 

Prof Keith Barnham, Imperial College London, suggests renewable energy technologies can play a key role in arresting the spread of nuclear weapons in the Middle East and elsewhere.

Article from SGR Newsletter 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 22 October 2012)
 

18 months have passed since the massive earthquake and tsunami off the east coast of Japan triggered the Fukushima nuclear accident. Dr Ian Fairlie and Dr Stuart Parkinson, SGR, give an overview of why the nuclear disaster happened, why it is still occurring, and its implications to date.

Article from SGR Newsletter, no. 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 22 October 2012)
 

Dr Rebecca Johnson, Acronym Institute, highlights the limited progress in nuclear disarmament since the end of the Cold War. Nevertheless, she argues that new academic research can help to reframe nuclear threats, providing future opportunities for more effective international initiatives to ban nuclear weapons.

Article from SGR Newsletter 41, autumn 2012 (published online: 22 October 2012)
 

Bumper 20th anniversary issue published - 11 expert authors provide important and novel analysis of controversial issues in science, design and technology.

Press release, 22 October 2012